day 12 of farmacology: farms help communities

One of the things you may not know about farm folks is that

we know that farms are an economic benefit . 



Ok. You probably figured that, but sometimes it's worth repeating. A lot. 


Farms bring jobs to their communities. Our farm hires men and women to milk cows three times a day, mechanics to keep the machinery in working order, calf feeders, heifer feeders, welders, construction workers . . . 

But we also provide work for people outside the farm. The mechanics at our local dealership sometimes have to fix our equipment. The local trucking company supplies drivers to haul our milk, bring in gravel or drop off feed. Local law enforcement and teachers work part-time driving trucks during silage season. The local dozer operator does dirt work on terraces. 


And then consider the money that goes back into the community as a result of the farm's purchases: gas, diesel, electricity, water, seed, fertilizer, tires, paint, equipment, concrete, steel, dog food for our four canines who eat about as much as all the cows combined . . . 


Then there's the auxiliary people whose jobs are also dependent on agriculture: the accountant who keeps tabs on the books, the milk inspector who checks on the safety of the food produced, the public water supply district staff, the seed salesman . . . 

Jobs for people doing the farming, employment for folks providing services to the farm, dollars that go back into organizations providing goods to the farm . . . all added benefits to farming . . . on top of producing delicious things like milk! 

Or pork. Because I'll always be a pig farmer's daughter. 


And that, to quote my farmer, is why "capitalism is so freaking awesome." Its benefits are so far reaching!



Want to read more of my 31 day farmacology writing challenge? Click here. 





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